suzanne@stylesense.co.uk                     07977 161659             Facebook ~  Hand Drawn by Suzanne

by Suzanne

Beautiful Wedding Stationery

LET ME BRING YOUR VISION TO LIFE


Your wedding day is so special, so make it even more meaningful with personalised wedding stationery and artwork.  Its the little details that make all the difference. I will incorporate any aspect of your life together to create unique artwork to make your memorable occasion even more personal.

From your venue, to your wedding dress, favourite hobby, the place you fell in love, a poem or the words of your “together” song, your wedding stationery will tell the story of you and help set the scene for your wonderful day to give you and your guests lasting happy memories.


Other Special Occasions


We begin creating your stationery by you telling me about yourselves.  How you met, what your favourite things are, what you both love to do and we gradually I build up a picture of what your unique love story is.   Send me photos to work with, poems, song lyrics whatever is personal to you both.

We then talk about your wedding colours and style. I then begin to work your ideas into rough designs which I will email or send you before going ahead with the actual artwork, so you are happy that your vision is coming to life, the way you want it to!  If you are local to me we can meet or I work remotely through email images and can deliver anywhere in the country or abroad.


For an idea of prices, please take a look at my Price Guide page.  However all weddings are unique, so give me a call and I will work closely with you to create a stationery package that will suit both you and your budget.

See below for information on when to send your invitations, etiquette and readings for your ceremony


Your wedding invitations should contain the following information:~

Names of the Bride and Groom or the Bride’s parent or other hosts

Where the ceremony is taking place

Date, month and year of the wedding ceremony

Time of the ceremony

Location of the wedding reception

Contact details for the guests to reply to


For a formal wedding invitation:~

Include all names written infull (including middle names)

Avoid abbreviations

Traditionally the Bride is listed before the Groom using Christian and middle names only however, please do bear in mind some religions and military weddings require the opposite

Numbers are usually spelt out as words eg ‘2’ becomes’two’ unless the number has more than two digits

If the ceremony is of a religious nature, “the honour of your presence is the phrase used.  If the ceremony is a civil one this is replaced with, “The Pleasure of Your Company”


Other Useful Information to Include:~

Specify the dress code e.g. black tie, formal wear, smart, no jeans etc.

Let guests know if food be served at an evening function

If children are invited, make this clear and include their name on the invitation.  However, if you do not wish children to attend, include a short tactful note, such as, “We are sorry, but we are unable to accommodate children”

Put maps and directions to the ceremony and reception venue and be sure that car parking areas are clearly marked.  Your ushers can help you on the day.  Include a list of nearby hotels and B&Bs and their prices.

Having a “Please reply by” date can help you in your planning and gives you an excuse to give a gentle nudge if guests haven’t replied by the date requested.

Don’t forget to order a few spare invitations etc to allow for mistakes when writing them out and for any extra guests you may decide to ask at a later date.

Don’t drink too much whilst writing out your invitations, mistakes will happen!!

WHEN TO SEND YOUR INVITATIONS.  INVITATION ETIQUETTE ~ HELPFUL INFORMATION AND  ADVICE ON WORDING

WHEN TO SEND YOUR INVITATIONS

Wedding invitations are usually sent approximately six weeks prior to the wedding date.  However it is always best to give as much notice as possible especially during busy holiday periods to allow for guests to book time off work and not double book other events.  Save-the-Date cards can be sent immediately you have set a date and once you have booked your venue and celebrant or vicar.

Evening invitations may be sent out at the same time as the day invitations.  However, you may wish to leave this until a little later, in case some of your day guests are unable to attend and you have the opportunity of inviting an evening guest to the day ceremony, especially if your reception venue requires you to seat a minimum number.

If you include RSVP cards these should be returned to you no later than 4 weeks before the wedding so you can finalise numbers with your venue.  


You should allow one invitation per family including a courtesy one for the Groom’s parents and the vicar or celebrant and their partner.  Also include family and friends who you may already know cannot come, but who would appreciate an invitation, for example an elderly relative.

INVITATION WORDING

I can help you with the wording of your invitations, whether you would like formal or informal wording.  Whether the invitations are coming from the Bride and Groom or the Bride’s parents.  Here are some examples and etiquette to follow, but if you need more advice, please ask


What to include on wedding invitations

Although your wedding invitation wording may differ – depending on the degree of formality you want to convey – make sure it includes the following:

names of the bride’s parents or other hosts

first name of the bride

first name and surname of the bridegroom and his title (Mr/Lieutenant/Sir etc)

where the ceremony is taking place

date, month and year of the wedding ceremony

location of the wedding reception

address to which guests should reply and a reply date

You might also wish to include:

details of any dress code/theme

time guests can expect the day to come to an end

whether children are invited

Who sends out the invitations?


The traditional approach

If you want to follow traditional invitation style, there are a few rules to follow:

Invitations are generally written in the third person.

The bride’s name should appear before the groom’s.

When listing the time, date and venue, the time and date should be written first and the venue last.

Use titles, such as Dr, Mrs, etc when appropriate.

‘The honour of your presence’ or ‘The pleasure of your company’ is the normal choice of wording. The former is often used for invitations to religious ceremonies such as a church wedding; the latter for invitations to an event in a non religious venue.

How you break up the lines is up to you. Generally, names, times and places are placed on separate lines.

Wording can be adapted to accommodate different circumstances due to death, divorce and re-marriage on the bride’s side. For example:

(if either parent is widowed):
Mr James Jones / Mrs Pamela Jones, requests the pleasure…

(parents are divorced):
Mr James Jones and Mrs Pamela Jones request the pleasure…

(parents divorced, mother remarried):
Mr James Jones and Mrs Paula Matthews request…

Continental Europeans and practising members of the Jewish community send cards including the names of both sets of parents eg: Mr and Mrs James Jones request the pleasure of your company at the marriage of their daughter Susan to Neil, son of Mr & Mrs Simon Berg.

Inviting children

If children are invited, make this clear by including their names on their parents’ invitation. Parents should assume that the invitation is for them alone if their children’s names are not specified.

It can be tactful to include a short note to parents, such as: ‘Much as we would like to invite all the children of our friends, it is only possible to accommodate the children of close family’, or, ‘We are sorry we are unable to accommodate children’. If you are inviting children, let parents know if you have made special childcare arrangements: ‘We have arranged child minding facilities for the duration of the service and/or reception’.


Invitations to the reception or an evening party

If space is limited at your ceremony venue, you may wish to invite more guests along to the reception afterwards. You may then decide to invite even more guests for your party in the evening.

A reception invitation will ‘request the pleasure of your company’. An evening party invite can be equally formal, but can also be informal depending on the style of your wedding.



Who to address the invitations

Invitations are always sent from whoever is hosting the wedding, traditionally the bride’s parents. The wording becomes more complicated if parents are divorced or if the couple are hosting the event themselves.

The usual wording for a traditional invitation is:


Mr & Mrs James Hall

request the pleasure of your company

at the marriage of their daughter

Sarah to Mr Nigel Wilton

at St Mary’s Church, Hinton,

on (date), (month), (year),

at (time)

and afterwards at (reception venue).

RSVP: (host’s address).


Who is hosting your wedding? Below are sample wordings for:

the bride’s parents

both sets of parents

you’re hosting your own wedding

you with both sets of parents

a single parent

a divorced parent with their spouse/bride or groom’s step parent

jointly hosted by divorced parents


The bride’s parents

Mr & Mrs Smithson

Request the honour of your presence at the marriage of their daughter

Mary Rose

to Mark Anthony

son of

Mr & Mrs Michaels

on (date), (month), (year),

at (time)

All Saints Church, Froxfield, Wiltshire


Both sets of parents

Mr & Mrs Smithson

and

Mr & Mrs Michaels

request the pleasure of your company

at the marriage of their daughter

Mary Rose

to Mark Anthony

on (date), (month), (year),

at (time)

All Saints Church, Froxfield, Wiltshire


You’re hosting your own

Ms Mary Rose Smithson

and

Mr Mark Anthony Michaels

request the pleasure of your company

at their marriage

on (date), (month), (year),

at (time)

All Saints Church, Froxfield, Wiltshire



You with both sets of parents

Mr & Mrs Smithson

and their daughter

Mary Rose

together with

Mr & Mrs Michaels

and their son

Mark Anthony

request the honour of your presence

at the wedding of

Mary Rose

and

Mark Anthony

on (date), (month), (year),

at (time)

All Saints Church, Froxfield, Wiltshire


A single parent

Mr Smithson

requests the pleasure of your company

at the marriage of his daughter

Mary Rose

to

Mark Anthony

on (date), (month), (year),

at (time)

All Saints Church, Froxfield, Wiltshire


A divorced parent with their spouse, bride or groom’s step parent

Jane & Tom Andrews

request the pleasure of your company

at the marriage of Jane Smithson’s daughter

Mary Rose

to

Mark Anthony

son of Mr & Mrs Michaels

on (date), (month), (year),

at (time)

All Saints Church, Froxfield, Wiltshire


Jointly hosted by divorced parents

Mr Smithson

and

Mrs Thomson

request the pleasure of your company

at the marriage of their daughter

Mary Rose

to

Mark Anthony

son of

Mr & Mrs Michaels

on (date), (month), (year),

at (time)

All Saints Church, Froxfield, Wiltshire



Invitations from someone other than the bride or groom’s parents

If the host of the wedding is neither the bride nor the groom’s parents but another relation, you should word the invitation omitting the word daughter/son and adding the hosts’ relationship:

grandparents = granddaughter/grandson

aunt and uncle = niece/nephew

godparents = goddaughter/godson

foster parents = foster daughter/foster son

brother = sister/brother

sister = sister/brother

Invitations for joint weddings

If, for example, two sisters are getting married, the name of the older sister and her future husband should go first.


All artwork is copyrighted © by Suzanne Thomson: all rights reserved.

The reproduction of any image in whole or part is prohibited unless prior written permission from the artist is obtained.

Please email suzanne@stylesense.co.uk with any queries


Luxury ~ Bespoke Design Service

For something extra special package your invitations, RSVPs, and maps in a ribbon, lace or card wrapped bundle, gatefold, pocketfold or wallet style pack so all your important details are easily to hand for your guests.  And for extra wow factor line your envelopes with a personalised message or coordinating print.

Suzanne also designs stationery for other occasions, such as wedding blessings, renewal of vows,  birthdays, anniversaries and Christening  or naming ceremonies, as well as final farewells.